Posts tagged Hawaii
Sunrise

Whenever I'm home, I make it a point to do a sunrise hike at least once. Oahu being a volcanic island, it's not hard to find an east-facing mountain from which to get a good view. Normally I'll choose the Lanikai pillboxes or the Makapu'u lighthouse trails since they're relatively fast and don't require missing out on too much sleep. During this little jaunt home, however, I was feeling up to a challenge, and with my sister and a few of our cousins did a harder trail that normally takes about three hours start to finish.

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On Nature.

When most people hear the word "camping," they probably think of tents in the forest, dirt underfoot, the smell of pine in the air. But to my family, camping is something a little different. The word gets passed around the house in the week preceding a calm, clear Saturday, normally no earlier than May and no later than September. Dad asks Mom for permission to whisk away her two daughters for a day and a night, to drive the hour and a half to the farthest point of the island from our home and set up camp on the wide, white sands of the North Shore. To us, camping means long hours swimming in the deep ocean chasing after sea turtles; afternoons with hand poles scouring tide pools for bait; falling asleep under dark, star-filled skies.

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Pidgin Pt. 1

Much like Spam musubi, lei, and the ocean, Pidgin is an integral part of local Hawaiian culture and identity. And while some people, including many locals, still think of Pidgin as merely being bad English, linguists identify it as a creole language (a distinct language that's taken much of its vocabulary from another language but has its own grammatical rules). And because it's so important, I figured it'd be worth it to split it into two separate posts. So today I'll talk about Pidgin, what it is, and how it's thought of. Then later on in a second part, I'll talk a bit about some common words/phrases that you'll hear and their origins in different languages.

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Superstitions and Hauntings of Hawaii

As a melting pot of cultures, Hawaii has dozens, perhaps even hundreds, of spooky stories and superstitions originating from all corners of the globe (or, at least Asia). And depending on the household they grew up in, someone born and raised in Hawaii may be familiar with more or less of them. But regardless of culture, there are a few that every kid in Hawaii knows and every visitor should know. Here are a few.

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Obon, Hawaiian Style

Hawaii is this beautiful, magical, wonderful place unlike any other. The lush green mountains, crystal clear water, and near perfect year round weather rightfully draw people from around the world, but what really makes it special is the way that it brings together different cultures and traditions and makes them its own.

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